TI Cloud Bundle: MSP432P401R LaunchPad & CC3100 BP

Table of contents

MSP432P401R Launchpad Description
MSP432 LaunchpadThe MSP432P401R LaunchPadMSP432P401R LaunchPad enables you to develop high performance applications that benefit from low power operation. It features the MSP432P401R – which includes a 48MHz ARM Cortex M4F, 95uA/MHz active power and 850nA RTC operation, 14-bit 1MSPS differential SAR ADC and AES256 accelerator.
This Launchpad includes an on-board emulator with EnergyTrace+ Technology, which means you can program and debug your projects without the need for additional tools, while also measuring total system energy consumption.
All pins of the MSP-EXP432P401R device are fanned out for easy access. These pins make it easy to plug in 20-pin and 40-pin BoosterPacks that add additional functionality like wireless, capacitive touch and more.
The out-of-box provided with the MSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPad features a graphical user-interface that enables the user to type in the desired beats per minute of an RGB LED, and select from over 16 million color options.
MSP432P401R Launchpad Features
  • Low-power, high performance MSP432P401R MCU
    • 48MHz 32-bit ARM Cortex M4F with Floating Point Unit and DSP acceleration
    • Power consumption: 95uA/MHz active, and 850nA RTC standby operation
    • Analog: 24Ch 14-bit differential 1MSPS SAR ADC, Two Comparators
    • Digital: Advanced Encryption Standard (AES256) Accelerator, CRC, DMA, HW MPY32
    • Memory: 256KB Flash, 64KB RAM
    • Timers: 4 x16-bit, and 2 x 32-bit
    • Communication: Up to 4 I2C, 8 SPI, 4 UART
  • 40-pin BoosterPack Connector, and support for 20 pin BoosterPacks including the CC3100 SimpleLink™ BoosterPack.
  • Onboard XDS-110ET emulator featuring EnergyTrace+ Technology
  • 2 buttons and 2 LEDs for User Interaction
  • Back-channel UART via USB to PC
CC3100BOOST-SimpleLink™ Wi-Fi CC3100 BoosterPack Description
The SimpleLink™ Wi-Fi® CC3100 BoosterPackSimpleLink™ Wi-Fi® CC3100 BoosterPack (with QFN-packaged device) can be used to connect to TI LaunchPad evaluation kits. With the Advanced Emulation BoosterPack (CC31XXEMUBOOST), CC3100BOOST can connect to a PC for MCU Emulation and software development using SimpleLink Studio for CC3100 (available in the CC3100 SDK). This kit can also be connected to other platforms through pins – use the programming guide for instructions on porting driver and sample code to any microcontroller.
CC3100BOOST-SimpleLink™ Wi-Fi CC3100 BoosterPack Features
  • CC3100 Wi-Fi Network Processor in QFN package
  • Industry's first devices to be Wi-Fi CERTIFIED™ at the chip level by the Wi-Fi Alliance™
  • 2 20-pin stackable connectors (BoosterPack headers) to connect to TI LaunchPads and other BoosterPacks
  • On-board chip antenna with option for U.FL-based testing
  • Power from on-board LDO using USB OR 3.3V from MCU LaunchPad
  • 2 push buttons
  • 4 LEDs
  • Jumper with 0.1 Ohm resistor for current measurement
  • 0.8 megabit serial flash
  • 40 MHz crystal, 32 KHz crystal and oscillator
  • U.FL and chip antenna
  • USB
  • 4 Layer PCB with 6 mm spacing and track width
Webinar
Product Videos
Terms & Conditions
  • Testers will be selected on the basis of quality of applications: we expect a full and complete description of why you want to test these particular products.
  • Testers are required to produce a full, comprehensive and well thought out review within 2 months of receipt of the product.
  • Failure to provide this review within the above timescale will result in the enrolee being excluded from future RoadTests.
Reviews for this Roadtest
Comment List
Anonymous
  • Hello,

     

    You can post the review by selecting Create>RoadTest Review> and including the review above ,along with your ratings in the "RoadTest Review" content type.

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    Dave

  • Here's my road test review that I've written up. I wasn't sure if this was the right place to post it, so please let me know if you'd like it posted anywhere else or have any questions!

     

     

    This is my first roadtest review, so I’m not quite sure what the general user here is looking for this review, but here goes! Please let me know if you have any questions.


    My overall reaction to the MSP432 and CC3100 BP is very positive. The price point is fantastic and the board comes with a very nice set of peripherals. I was able to get the device up and running within 45 minutes out of the box with a simple flashing LED example. The getting started guides are fairly easy to find and follow and provide a solid starting point for new users.


    similar

    I’ll be comparing the MSP432 Launchpad against several other microcontrollers centered around a similar price point and target user space. The first controller to look at was the precursor Launchpads: the LM4F Launchpad, the newer TM4C Tivaware Launchpad, and the MSP430 launchpad. The MSP430 is a very different controller even though the name hints otherwise. It is a very lower power, cheap, simple controller. The MSP432 has a significantly more advanced architecture, and a fairly different target use case (although low power is a center feature of both boards). The LM4F and TM4C Launchpads (primarily differing in the addition of hardware PWM and Quadrature encoders in the TM4C and the driver software switch from StellarisWare to TivaWare) are much closer in line with the MSP432, costing about the same and including a similar set of peripherals. Both boards are centered around the same ARM controller and come with a somewhat similar set of driver software. For those of you who have used StellarisWare or TivaWare in the past, the new library feels a bit more streamlined at first. allowing pin initializations to be done in a single line rather than initializing the clock register for the entire port first, then setting the pin type mux, direction, etc (not a huge difference, but a somewhat nice one I feel). I was (still am I guess) a huge fan of the LM4F/TM4C boards, I’ve used them extensively for the last 3 years for projects ranging from writing embedded RTOS’s, robotics applications, and general purpose messing around. For the price they are fantastic. This board comes at the same price point and offers just about everything I loved about the TM4C with some extra goodies tacked on (hardware AES modules. energy trace utilities).

     


    You can compare this with Arduinos, but if you at least somewhat know C, this board is half the price and provides more functionality so I’d stick with this.


    The other interesting line of products I’d like to point out are the ARM MBed boards versus the Launchpads. These are a very interesting, and relatively recent (within the last few years) line of microcontrollers being pushed out by ARM to sell their chip IP and advocate IoT solutions. They’re unique in their ease of use and online IDE concept. They have a very clever setup where the device appears as virtual drive when plugged in, allowing you to download a bin file from the online IDE and just drop it into the attached drive to program it. You can get a new MBed board and have it running within 10 minutes out of the box. The mbed library is very straight forward to use as well. The price range tends to be a bit higher, but they have products ranging from $15-$60+ with a variety of utilities and target applications. I’ve messed with the FRDM K64F and KL46Z and have had very good experiences with these boards. Where they run into some issues versus the MSP432 is ease of debugging (MSP432 was pretty easy to jump into debugging with). Since the mbed lines push the online IDE which cannot debug the boards you have to jump through some hoops. You can export projects into a huge variety of targets which is nice, including GCC, Keil, Zip files, etc. Keil 5 showed support for the K64F, although I ran into some problems getting it working I haven’t put too much effort into it yet. I was more interesting in Linux support, which was pretty easy to get due to the GCC export option. I was able to get PyOCD and GDB to work with the boards, but it was a fairly frustrating process at first and leaves quite a bit of streamlining to be desired. Overall between the mbed and launchpad line, I’m becoming a slightly larger mbed fan due to its very comprehensive library (interfaced to a Sonar incredibly quickly, PWM and serial were ridiculously easy to setup) but still love the MSP432 for it’s easy debugging and very low price point.


    I’ve been working on a basic robotics library (Sonar, IR, and motor controller interfacing, PID controllers, etc) for the MSP432 and it’s been pretty simple so far to dive into. The CCB100 is a great device to compliment the MSP432 and allows for new avenues to explore that I’ve never much touched before in the embedded world. My goal was to interface a temperature sensor to the launchpad and hook it up to a new electric smoker I recently got. I would then be able to connect through WiFi to a home server that could text me updates and log temperature data (and in the future smoke levels ideally). Finding good documentation for the MSP432 and CCB100 together was a bit more difficult than I thought at first. The driver software for the CCB100 was very comprehensive and well formatted, but was largely focused at MSP430 devices and other board architectures. I got some basic examples working, but nothing much as of now (work started to catch up with me). I still need to look more into the wireless networking capabilities of the CCB100 with the MSP432 specifically, but it seems like a fairly cheap and powerful tool to add to the line of launchpad breakout boards.

  • Thanks, congratulations to you too Teixi!

  • Thanks and congratulations to kgilbert1993 as well !!!

  • A hearty good work and well done to kgilbert1993 and teixi .

    Clem

  • when winner list will be published ??

  • Thank you Clem

    No dates are specifies were in this were in other they specifies date that's why I ask. I now got how it work. As per you mention Patience is a virtue is completely true.

  • It takes some time before any announcements due to how many applications are read and considered. Patience sir is a virtue.

  • Hello

    I am new to this community. May i know how should we know that who is the  lucky winner for this board ?  what is his\her idea ?