Microchip PoE to USB-C® Power and Data Adapter - Review

Table of contents

RoadTest: Microchip PoE to USB-C® Power and Data Adapter

Author: skruglewicz

Creation date:

Evaluation Type: Power Supplies

Did you receive all parts the manufacturer stated would be included in the package?: True

What other parts do you consider comparable to this product?: don't have any other comparable products at this time.

What were the biggest problems encountered?: Getting the power to my devices? ....... Getting devices with equipment purchased and my Network cables? ...... There is also a Green LED on the type C supplied cable. I'm not sure what this is indicating?

Detailed Review:

This review will evaluate the claims made by MicroChip on the Packaging and in the Datasheet for the "Poe to USB-C Adapter".

  • I will be conducting experiments using the adapter to evaluate the claims on the packaging
  • Basically the Microchip PoE to USB-C adapter connects USB-C devices to the PoE network and converts both power and data into a single USB-C connector.
  • In order to test the adapter, I needed to purchase a few things from Amazon
    • a TP-Link PoE Injector | PoE Adapter 48V DC (TL-POE4824G)
    • USB A to Type C 2.0 adapters 3 pack. Which I plan use to connect to a PC and my power supply module.
    • 3.3V 5V Solderless Breadboard Power Supply Module.

New UPDATED 7/11//2021

Power Problems SOLVED!

  • With the help of my fellow Roadtest reviewers, I was able to figure this out.
  • They mentioned the use of a OTG adapter to attach to the USB Type-C female connector  on the PoE adapter.
    • I found an USB OTG MALE type-C to FEMALE Type-A  adapter in my box of adaptors.
    • I attached it first to the PoE adapter and with the help of some other USB cables ,adaptors and couplers, I was able to get all my IoT  devices power.
    • I did not have to install or configure the OS on any device, it just worked.
    • It would of have been nice for Microchip to include that and OTG cable might be needed to power devices in the Startup Guide.

 

Updated 7/8/2021

  • Now I cannot get POWER to any of my Devices that take a USB Type-C or conversion adapters to USB Type A,micro USB or Lighting Cables.
  • I am returning the TP-Link PoE Injector back to Amazon today.
  • So far I have only had success with the Ethernet feature with Windows 10 and Ubuntu 20.04.2 LTS host
  • I will continue to use the PoE to USB-C adapter with my Windows & Linux host as a Data Dongle in my Lab.

Unboxing

  • This section will describe with pictures the contents of the PoE adapter and additional components that were purchased in order to test the adapter.

PoE to USB-C adapter

    • This pictorial shows the parts in the box and the 4 page Quick Start Guide  included in the package
    • The Quick Start Guide is very useful to getting the adapter to operate correctly. I'll describe each page and my notes in the pictorial section below.
    • The package includes:
      • ( Model# PD-USB-DP60)
      • USB Type-C cable
        • 1 Foot long,with a screw on one end and a green LED indicator on the other.
      • Grey Carrying  Pouch to store the adapter.
        • the protective inner layer has a nice label indicating that  a "Storage Pouch is under protective base". Nice added feature, so users don't throw it away
      • QUICK START GUIDE
        • Very small print, but useful in getting the adapter to function.
      • China RoHS compliant Certificate
        • I had never seen one of these packaged with electronic before.

 

What came in the BOX?

Quick Start Guide

MY CHECKLIST

and NOTES

COVER PAGE

1. Connect an IEEE® 802.3af/at/bt-compliant PSE to the PD-USB-DP60’s “PoE IN” RJ45 socket using a standard Cat 5/5e/6 Ethernet cable. (Note: The maximum allowed length of the Ethernet cable is 100 meters).

  • DONE
    • I did have a grey patch cable attached at first but then noticed that the LEDs on the PoE in jack were not on, so I switched it out for a better cable. Now the LEDs are working.
    • I then attached the other end of cable to the PoE out on the Injector (Refer to the injector section below for connections.)

2. Check that the “Power” LED is yellow to verify that the PD-USB-DP60 is powered on.

  • DONE
    • switch out the cable and this started working!

3.Connect one side of the supplied USB Type-C® cable to the PD-USB-DP60’s USB-C socket. (Note: Any USB-C connection polarity is allowed.)

  • DONE
    • Used the screw end to attach and secure the cable end to the adapter. This is a nice feature.

4. Connect the other side of the USB Type-C cable to the USB-C powered device.

  • TODO on all experiments.
    • I WIll be connecting to several types of devices in my experiments.
    • I did notice that the green LED was lit for certain devices and not for others. What does this mean?

5. Verify that the USB-C powered device is getting power from the PD-USB-DP6

  • TODO on all experiments.
    • Noticed that the Green LED was lit when attached to my smartphone, but the phone was not taking a charge?
    • I will need to figure this out on for other devices.in my experiments

PAGE 2

 

Ethernet-to-USB-C Data Dongle

If PoE power isn’t available, and wired Ethernet is required, the PD-USB-DP60 can be powered from a USB Host:

1. Connect one side of the supplied USB Type-C cable to the USB-C host.

2. Connect the other side of the USB Type-C cable to the PD-USB-DP60’s USB-C socket.

3. Connect a standard Cat 5/5e/6 Ethernet cable the PD-USB-DP60’s “PoE IN” RJ45 socket to connect to an IEEE 802.3 10/100/1000 Mbps network.

 

  • the LED Indicators table on page 2, is indicating the 2 LEDs on the PoE In connector on the adapter.
  • There is also an Green LED on the type C supplied cable.I'm not sure what this is indicating?

PAGE 3

Specifications

Data

• PoE IN

• 10/100/1000 Mbps

• USB Type-C

• USB 2.0

• USB 3.1 Gen 1

Power

• PoE IN

• Input Voltage: 42-57 VDC

• Input Current: 1.75A max

• USB Type-C

• 5 VDC/3A

• 9 VDC/3A

• 15 VDC/3A

• 20 VDC/3A

PAGE 4

Notes

  • If the USB host is running the:
    • Windows® operating system, the device driver should be automatically installed (plug and play) after the PD-USB-DP60 is connected.
    • Linux® may require driverinstallation in case the LAN7800 Ethernet controller is missing.
    • Apple® requires driver installation.

 

  • If the USB host DOES NOT  recognize the PD-USB-DP60 as a USB device, please go to the  LAN7800 product page to download and install the appropriate device driver.

 

  • Powering multiple PD-USB-DP60 from the same PoE multiport midspan may affect data/power performance to connected USB-C devices (i.e. laptop)
    • if they are sharing common peripheral equipment such as monitors, projectors, etc.

 

Technical Support

For technical support please visit the Microchip Technical Support Portal www.microchip.com/support

 

LAN7800 Driver

To download device drivers for the LAN7800 please visit the LAN7800 WEB page: LAN7800

 

On this page the following points are relevant to these test. .In the

 

 

  • drivers are Available via the Documentation link on this page.
  • A driver supporting this product is already present in the Linux mainline kernel.
    • Specific backports, when available, can be found within the drivers listed here.
      • TODO -- WIll be Tested on Ubuntu
  • Android is supported via Linux mainline or, when applicable, specific backports available via the documentation link on this page.
    • TODO -- WIll be tested with Android

 

Additional components

    • PoE injector - TL-POE4824G

    • Updated I'm returning this injector and will try another one. The Power problems that I'm encountering are probably due to this model.
      • Product description

        • Style:48V/24W, Passive

        • The passive PoE adapter TL-POE4824G can be used to simultaneously supply power and transmit data to a passive PoE device, such as TP-Link's EAP245 3. 0, EAP225 3. 0, CPE610. TL-POE4824G.

      • Order it on Amazon

        TP-Link PoE Injector | PoE Adapter 48V DC Passive PoE | Gigabit Ports | Up to 100 Meters(325 feet) | Wall Mountable Design (TL-PoE4824G), White

        PoE out and LAN InPower cord connector
        HOOKUP DiagramNotes

        I connected the injector as shown in the diagram and the Adapter is used as a "Passive PoE device"  depicted on the right of the diagram.

        1  Connected the Ethernet cable from my switch to the LAN connector.

        2. Connected one end of an Ethernet cable to the PoE out connector on the injector. and the other end into the PoE connection on the Adapter.

        3. Plug in the AC power cord.

        4. power LED shown green on the injector.

        5. Power LED showed YELLOW and Link/Act LED showed steady GREEN.

         

        Website: https://www.tp-link.com/us/

        product Page: https://www.tp-link.com/us/business-networking/accessory/tl-poe4824g/#overview

         

 

 

 

 

Experiments

  • This review will evaluate the claims made by Microchip on the Packaging and in the Datasheet for the "Poe to USB-C Adapter".
  • I will be conducting experiments using the adapter to evaluate the claims on the packaging
  • New     USB Cables, Adaptors and Couplers used for IoT Device connections

    • USB DescriptionUSB ConnectorsConnect to these devices

      USB OTG (On The GO) Adapter

      Apple Model: A1632

      USB Type-C MALE to TYPE-A FEMALE1st in line for all devices tested
      USB AdapterUSB Type-A MALE to Type-C 2.0  FEMALE

      Android Phone

      USB Type-C cableUSB Type-A MALE to Type-C MALEAndroid Phone

      USB Type-C cable (supplied in the package)

      Green LED power indicator at one end.

      USB Type-C MALE to Type-C MALEAndroid Phone

      Apple Lightning Cable

      USB Type-A FEMALE to lighting  MALE

      USB Type-C OTG MALE to LIGHTING MALE (Needed)

      iPad
      USB Gender Coupler

      USB Type-A MALE to Type-A MALE

      Breadboard Power Module
      Micro USB  cableUSB Type-A MALE to Micro USB MALE

      Arduino NANO 33 IoT

      Raspberry PI Zero W

      USB Type-C cableUSB-Type-A MALE to Type C MALERaspberry PI 4

       

  • Listed on the box:

  • Comments on my findings

  • Here are my comments on each claim mention on the package.

 

    • Converts Poe to USB-C power and Data

      • Initially had Problems testing and proving this on all devices in my experiments.
        • At First, Only Data on PC's Windows and Linux was working.
        • A break through happened with an OTG adapter that solved all the problems.
        • Maybe an OTG adapter should be included in the package?
    • Power over Ethernet input (0-90W)

      • still to be seen for 5v and 9v devices
    • USB-C Output (5V/9V/15V/20v 3A)

      • Initially had Problems testing and proving this on all devices in my experiments.
      • Now using the OTG adapter I'm getting 5V and 9V to my devices.
    • Allows for installation for up to 328 feet

      • I wasn't able to test this on my small network.
    • USB type C cable included

      • YES it does include a 1ft Type C Cable
      • NOTE the Green LED on one end will be on if power is detected running over the cable. THis point was not mentioned in the ""
    • Plug & Play - no configuration is needed

      • Seems to be only for Windows?
      • Works PoE on Ubuntu
      • Looks like you need to install the driver from the web site for Linux, Android, and Apple For LAN support.
      • Not sure about power to PC with windows?
        • I'm not sure if power can be supplied to the hardware over USB?
      • After I discovered that an OTG cable was required for IoT devices
      • This is now working with no additional configuration on the device to the OS.

 

    • Supports

        • ETHERNET:  Working

          POWER:        n/a

          • Connect the other side of the USB Type-C cable to the FEMALE Type C 2.0  to MALE USB A  adapter

            • then plug then Male USB A end into the PC.  .

            • Turn Off WIFI
          • Verify that the USB-C powered device is getting power from the PD-USB-DP6

            • Power does not apply for PC. the Ethernet is working fine.
          • Verify that Ethernet is working.
            • It's Working... I'm able to see the Ethernet connected and can browse the Internet.
        • Linux Ubuntu -- on a recommissioned laptop
        • ETHERNET: WORKING

          POWER:       n/a

          • I connected the cable the same way as the windows PC above to a laptop run Ubuntu
          • I was able to connect to the internet an use the browser without the WIFI on .
          • I The settings showed that the Ethernet was connected.
          • Power does not apply here, even though I had the injector on my network.
        • PC Ethernet-to-USB-C Data Dongle powered from a USB Host:
        • ETHERNET: WORKING

          POWER:       WORKING

          • Microsoft Windows 10 OS

          • If PoE power isn’t available, and wired Ethernet is required, the PD-USB-DP60 can be powered from a USB Host:

1. Connect one side of the supplied USB Type-C cable to the USB-C host.

2. Connect the other side of the USB Type-C cable to the PD-USB-DP60’s USB-C socket.

3. Connect a standard Cat 5/5e/6 Ethernet cable the PD-USB-DP60’s “PoE IN” RJ45 socket to connect to an IEEE 802.3 10/100/1000 Mbps network.

          • the LED Indicators table on page 2, is indicating the 2 LEDs on the PoE In connector on the adapter.
          • This is working for me.

 

      • Tablet

      • ETHERNET:  NOT WORKING  no drivers for apple iPad

        POWER:       NOT WORKING need OTG cable

        • APPLE IPAD
          • I used an adapter, a USB Type A coupler and an Apple Lighting cable  to connect the PoE adapter to the IPad.
          • No charging was indicated using the injector.

          • Was not able to test the network.

 

      • Cell Phone

      • UPDATE 7/11/2021

        ETHERNET: NOT TESTED

        POWER:      NOW working With OTG CABLE

          • I attached the following cables to get this to work:

            1. OTG USB Type-C MALE to TYPE-A FEMALE

            2. USB Type-A MALE to Type-C MALE

             

      • Any Other USB-C device

      • UPDATED 7/11/2021

        ETHERNET: Not Tested

        POWER:       Now WORKING with OTG Adaptor attached 1st in line to the PoE adapter

        • ALAMSCN 3.3V 5V MB102 Solderless Breadboard Power Supply Module
          • I connected the type C cable with the adapter and plug it into USB A connector.
          • Network does not apply here.
          • Used the following 2 connectors:

            1. OTG USB Type-C MALE to TYPE-A

            2. USB Type-A MALE to Type-A MALE Coupler

             

        • Arduino Nano
          • I connected the type C connector to a type A adapter and plugged it into the Arduino.

          • Power was supplied to the Arduino.

          • The network has not been tested.

          • Used the following 2 connector cables

            1. OTG USB Type-C MALE to TYPE-A FEMALE

            2. USB Type-A MALE to Micro USB MALE

             

        • Raspberry PI 4

          • I connected the Type-C USB cable to the raspberry pi 4.

          • Power was supplied to the Raspberry PI
          • The network has not been tested.
          • I

            2. USB-Type-A MALE to Type C MALE

 

        • Raspberry PI Zero W
          • Hookup using Micro USB cable
          • Power was supplied to the Device
          • The network has not been tested.
          • I Used the following cables :

            1. OTG USB Type-C MALE to Type-C MALE

            2. USB Type-A MALE to Micro USB MALE

             

Summary & Conclusions

Summary

    • I had a problems getting the Power feature to work on all Devices.
    • The Ethernet seems to be working on the Windows devices.
    • I will continue experimenting on Android, Linux and RTOS devices with the Ethernet test.
    • Hopefully I can raise the score a bit with some better success with Power, But at this point here are my scores.
    • I am returning the POE injector. I’m not sure it is the right one?
    • UPDATE 7/11/2021

      Injector is now working and the PoE adapter is supplying power to all my IoT devices, NOW THAT I AM USING AN OTG ADAPTER!!

       

      Thanks to my fellow reviewers:

      For your information on a OTG cable to solve the problems  I was having with getting Power from the Microchip PoE Adapter to my IoT devices.

      The OTG cable that I found in the airport one day fixed everything.

      It is an APPLE product Model A1632.

Conclusions

  • The OTG cable that I found in the airport one day fixed everything.

  • I'm not sure why Microchip DID NOT include a OTG Cable in the package. If the
    • UPDATE 7/11/2021

      I am NOT changing my scores for this product.

      The use of an OTG Adapter, should be mentioned in the "Quick Start Guide"

      It would of made things a lot easier for me.

      Thanks to the Roadtest reviewers for the TIP on the OTG. After understanding the use of it and why it is needed, I was able to finish my experiments.

    • I would like to touch upon my reasons for scoring like I did at the beginning of this review.
    • Product Performed to Expectations: 6

      • I gave this a 6,  because I was expecting to have power to all devices right out of the box Plug and Play and that is not the case. I'm sure it is NOT entirely the PoE adapters fault, but it could also be the PoE power injector or the Ethernet cables or the USB cables.
    • Specifications were sufficient to design with: 8

      • I gave this an 8, because again the device is simple enough and the specs did instruct how to set it up , but it was not working as specified.
    • Demo Software was of good quality: 10

      • I gave this a 10,  but there was no Demo Software involved here. There is no N/A score so I gave it a 10. Probably have given it a 1.
      • If the LAN7800 driver could be considered "Demo Software" then a 10 would be sufficient because it did work.
    • Product was easy to use: 8

      • I gave this an 8, because again the device is simple enough to connect , I just tried to get power working on all devices and was unable to succeed and I'm not sure why.
    • Support materials were available: 5

      • I gave this a 5, because of the lack of diagnostic support and could not find any online support or forums to help me get my test done.
    • The price to performance ratio was good: 5

      • I gave this a 5,  because even if I was able to get power to my devices, the cost is kind of high for an adapter. I don't think I would shell out this much moony for this product and would seek out a cheaper solution. I'm a retired hobbyist though.

 

REFERENCES

LAN7800 Driver To download device drivers for the LAN7800 please visit the LAN7800 WEB page: LAN7800

drivers page

Helpful links on USB Cables.

 

 

What Is USB OTG? 10 Cool Ways to Use It on Android

Understanding USB Cable Types and Which One to Use

A very helpful answer to why you will need a OTG adapter. Thanks Gough

Jul 2, 2021 6:18 PM (in response to sean conway)

 

  wrote:

 

What specification do you recommend when ordering a adapter online to get one that supports the functions of USB-C?

 

My requirement is to go from the USB-C female (output of the Microchip PoE cable) to a USB micro micro (i.e connector on PiZeroW & Pi3B+).

 

If you have a recommendation that would be great!

That's a tough question to answer as the "functions of USB-C" don't all translate to the legacy connections - things like CC pins aren't passed through as they're internally terminated in the adapters, likewise side-band channels are usually left open.

 

As mentioned before - a USB-C to USB-A OTG adapter should be used as the first step. Whether you get a USB 3.0 capable one or a USB 2.0 one doesn't matter so much for the Raspberry Pi as their OTG ports are USB 2.0 only, but getting a USB 3.0 one may allow for more possibilities if you use it with other equipment. Plugging this into the PoE-USB-C adapter will tell it that it's connected as OTG so it can start sourcing power. Then a regular USB-A to USB-microB cable can be used from that adapter through to the Pi's microUSB-B connector. This regular cable will tell the Pi-end that it's connected as a device and can accept power (not that this matters as the Pi doesn't have an internal battery).

 

In the case of the Pi 3B+, there's no point in having data - the OTG pins on the USB plug are just open circuit as the hardware design uses the OTG controller to serve the hub/Ethernet chip that runs the four USB-A ports on that board. For the Pi Zero W, there should be some USB-OTG capability so it may be able to get the data link going as well under the above recommendation.

 

For reference, my USB-C to USB-A OTG adapter came from Daiso for AU$2.80. It's not a particularly high-quality USB 3.0 type adapter, but it does the job and is locally available in Australia. I'm not sure of a "single-cable" solution, as vendors aren't always clear as to what their adapters are configured for or their cables. If the end plugging into the PoE-USB-C adapter is configured not as OTG but as device, the adapter will not source power at all.

 

That being said - this cable is labelled as if it should do the trick - https://www.amazon.com.au/CableCreation-Braided-480Mbps-Android-Devices/dp/B0744BKDRD  but as I've not got one of them myself, I can't guarantee compatibility.

Similarly, the description on this one also seems to be just fine - https://www.amazon.com.au/AmazonBasics-USB-Type-Micro-Cable/dp/B01LONQ7R6

An adapter like this one should theoretically work too - noting it clearly says micro-USB B device - https://www.amazon.com.au/Female-Adapter-ARKTEK-Samsung-Galaxy/dp/B072J5B3BR/

 

That being said, if you have something that works already, I probably wouldn't be inclined to splurge on more random cables and adapters.

 

- Gough

 

Anonymous

Top Comments

  • Congrats SK, in getting your devices to a successful conclusion.

  • USB-C to Lightning Cable (1m). Part number is MX0K2FE/A

  • Hi

    IN your testing of the iPhone and iPad, did you get power to work? and if so, could you let me know the cables and or adapters (part# if available) you used.

     

    Thanks in Advance

  • I tested the iPhone and iPad for completeness - I was not expecting the ethernet to work as it requires silly drivers.

  • Hello aka

     

    Thank you for taking the time to write.  It's nice to know that another reviewer is struggling with this gear also.  Your right in saying  "to be used effectively requires a complete understanding of the capabilities of the device it is powering and providing data to." One thing that confuses me though,  is my experience with my Arduino device working with power the 1st time and then with the same configuration never powering up again. I thought I blew the board! But then I ran it under my usual power configuration and it booted up fine? Phew!

     

    I saw your review and another one from

    James seems to have had better luck with Power on the of the devices that I tried, but he posted no problems and any special configs on those devices. I also saw the question you posed and the answer from   His answer makes sense and I started to use the information given, but I still could not power up the PI 4.

     

    One of the problems I have with this product is that It is NOT "Plug and Play -- no configuration is needed ",  Here I am thinking that it will be easy to power my Evaluation Kit experiments with this and I get sucked into a sinkhole of learning how the Pi is powered. Well that is not Plug and Play to me. And the lack of help to diagnose the  power connections for the specific product is essential not to be found. Yes they have a drivers page but that is centered around the network chip not the PoE adapter itself. MicroChip, needs to up there online support and community for this product. And at the very less Certify which devices can draw power from the PoE Adapter.

     

    If I discover anymore information on power to devices,  I'll let you know. But for now I'm going to give this thing a rest.

     

    Thanks for listening.

    Steve K

  • I struggled also .

     

    PoE, data connection and power connection over the same connector. Sounds simple but that turned out to be a different case. I did get some stuff working but other stuff I'm still confused. The introduction of USB-C adds the complexity. You go from 4 wires on USB-A to a possible 26 I think on USB-C.

     

    I still have some confusion. I also purchased cables and connectors that in the end proved useless. Well not useless, they proved what I thought I could do wouldn't work.

     

    I believe this device to be used effectively requires a complete understanding of the capabilities of the device it is powering and providing data to. I did manage to get data and power working on the Pi4 but then it uses USB-C and data enabled on the connector. I failed to get both data and power working on others.

     

    If the truth be told it was that gave me the knowledge to get it working. Lick your wounds and come out swinging on the next RoadTest.

  • Thank You

    Power is not my forte! I feel I might of not had the proper components (PoE injector, cables and Type-C to Type A adapters? )  to give this gear the proper review. It seems like the other reviewers had better luck with the PoE  power function of this adapter then I did.

    Thanks for your kind comment.

    Steve K